Weekly Announcements

Table of Contents

Don’t Forget Travel Signatures!

Get your travel signatures now to avoid the stress of waiting until the last minute! If you have had advising for travel before, just fill out the “Travel Signature Request” on ISSLink and drop off your I-20 or DS-2019 for signatures!

Need a Ride to XNA for Winter Break?

Your Associated Student Government is sponsoring a FREE shuttle to and from XNA for your winter travels!

You MUST register BEFORE December 5th! (That’s next week!)

Register Here:https://orgsync.com/150833/events/2578357/occurrences/6185033

December Events Calendar

International Christmas Fest

Join us for an international celebration of Christmas – Light of the World!  This program emphasizes the religious story of Christmas.  There will be presentations from all over the world.  Following the program, you can meet others and enjoy food samples at the Festival of Flavors.

This is all happening on Saturday, December 1, 2018 at 5 p.m. University Baptist Church in Fayetteville

Sponsors:  International Student Christian Association, Christ on Campus, International Students Incorporated, University Baptist Church, and other churches and individuals. 

Contact:  Kevin Smith ISCAKevinSmith@gmail.com 479-601-1750

 

Middle East Cinema Series Announces Fall 2018 Line-Up

Nadi Cinema screenings take place at 7 p.m. on select Wednesdays in the Hembree Auditorium, room 107E in the Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences Building, next to the Pat Walker Health Center on Maple Street.

From Turkey to Palestine, Iran to India, Nadi Cinema introduces viewers to the storytelling and vision of filmmakers across North Africa and the Middle East. All films — classics, cult favorites, recent hits, comedies, tragedies, political thrillers, social commentaries, and romances, in black-white and living color — are subtitled in English.

The series is hosted by Joel Gordon, professor in the Department of History at the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.

All screenings are free and open to the public, and take place at 7 p.m. in the Hembree Auditorium, room 107E in the Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences Building, west of the Pat Walker Health Center on Maple Street.

Wednesday, Dec. 5 – 

Boats Out of Watermelon Rinds (Turkey 2004)

A love story of cinema: two teens growing up in a village restore an old projector and show snippets of discarded film stock. Based on the director's personal experience and filmed in his village with an unprofessional cast (Turkish with English subtitles  97 minutes)

All five film screenings are free and open to the public, and all are subtitled in English. Nadi Cinema is sponsored by the King Fahd Center for Middle East Studies in the Fulbright College.

For film synopses, trailers and more information, visit the Nadi Cinema webpage and follow the King Fahd Center on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Beware of Employment Scams

College students across the country are taking the bait on an employment scam that gives scammers access to their bank accounts, according to an announcement from the FBI.

The scammers send out emails and post advertisements for job openings, typically recruiting students to take on administrative positions. During the hiring process, students are told they need to purchase certain equipment or supplies for the new job, and the “employer” will send a counterfeit check to reimburse them for the materials. After the student deposits the check, they are asked to send a portion of the money from their checking account to a third party.

The FBI included several examples of the email instructions from scammers in its public service announcement.

  • "You will need some materials/software and also a time tracker to commence your training and orientation and also you need the software to get started with work. The funds for the software will be provided for you by the company via check. Make sure you use them as instructed for the software and I will refer you to the vendor you are to purchase them from, okay."
  • "I have forwarded your start-up progress report to the HR Dept. and they will be facilitating your start-up funds with which you will be getting your working equipment from vendors and getting started with training."
  • "Enclosed is your first check. Please cash the check, take $300 out as your pay, and send the rest to the vendor for supplies."

After a student completes all of these steps, the results can be damaging -- they would need to reimburse the bank for the amount of the counterfeit checks, their bank account could be closed, their credit score could drop and they could be vulnerable to identity theft after divulging personal information to the scammers.

The FBI is encouraging students to report suspicious emails to their institution’s IT department and the FBI. The bureau also advises students never to accept a job that asks them to deposit or wire money.

 

Beware of IRS Scams

Don’t Fall for Scam Calls and Emails Posing as IRS

Scams continue to use the IRS as a lure. These tax scams take many different forms. The most common scams are phone calls and emails from thieves who pretend to be from the IRS. Scammers use the IRS name, logo or a fake website to try and steal money from taxpayers. Identity theft can also happen with these scams.

Taxpayers need to be wary of phone calls or automated messages from someone who claims to be from the IRS. Often these criminals will say the taxpayer owes money. They also demand payment right away. Other times scammers will lie to a taxpayer and say they are due a refund. The thieves ask for bank account information over the phone. The IRS warns taxpayers not to fall for these scams.

Below are several tips that will help filers avoid becoming a scam victim.

IRS employees will NOT:

  • Call demanding immediate payment. The IRS will not call a taxpayer if they owe tax without first sending a bill in the mail.
  • Demand payment without allowing the taxpayer to question or appeal the amount owed.
  • Require the taxpayer pay their taxes a certain way. For example, demand taxpayers use a prepaid debit card.
  • Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
  • Threaten to contact local police or similar agencies to arrest the taxpayer for non-payment of taxes.
  • Threaten legal action such as a lawsuit.

If a taxpayer doesn’t owe or think they owe any tax, they should:

  • Contact the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Use TIGTA’s “IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting” web page to report the incident.
  • Report the incident to the Federal Trade Commission. Use the “FTC Complaint Assistant” on FTC.gov. Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" to the comments of your report.

In most cases, an IRS phishing scam is an unsolicited, bogus email that claims to come from the IRS. Criminals often use fake refunds, phony tax bills or threats of an audit. Some emails link to sham websites that look real. The scammers’ goal is to lure victims to give up their personal and financial information. If they get what they’re after, they use it to steal a victim’s money and their identity.

For those taxpayers who get a ‘phishing’ email, the IRS offers this advice:

  • Don’t reply to the message.
  • Don’t give out your personal or financial information.
  • Forward the email to phishing@irs.gov. Then delete it.
  • Do not open any attachments or click on any links. They may have malicious code that will infect your computer.

More information on how to report phishing or phone scams is available on IRS.gov.

All taxpayers should keep a copy of their tax return. Beginning in 2017, taxpayers using a software product for the first time may need their Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) amount from their prior-year tax return to verify their identity. Taxpayers can learn more about how to verify their identity and electronically sign tax returns at Validating Your Electronically Filed Tax Return.  

Additional IRS Resources:

IRS YouTube Videos: